Monthly Archives: July 2016

The Forest – Film Review

At the foot of mount Fiji in Japan lies the deeply mysterious Aokigahara forest, widely known as a popular suicide destination. In 2010 alone, there were 54 confirmed cases. Nobody is quite sure what draws people from all over the country, and even further afield, there to end their days, but it has a long association with the Yurei of Japanese mythology, similar entities to what we would call ghosts. Yerei pray on the sad, lonely and vulnerable, using their own negative emotions against them. Sounds more like the script of a horror movie, right? Well, now it is, thanks to producer David S Goyer (the Blade franchise, Da Vinci’s Demons, and cult noughties TV show FreakyLinks) reading about the forest on wikipedia.

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Game of Thrones star Natalie Dormer plays an American woman who recieves a phonecall from the Japanese authorities saying that her identical twin sister has ventured into the Aokigahara forest and has not been seen since. Obviously, she gets on the next plane to the land of the rising Sun and rocks up to the very same hotel her sister was staying where she meets a western journalist who seems just a little too eager to help. Together with a guide, they head into the forest in search of the missing sister. All in all, it’s a good premise for a film. It’s atmospheric, well-produced, and for the most part well executed. It’s a pity the film lets itself down in other areas. The plot kinda drifts off and cannibalizes itself toward the end, and there are some mildly annoying oversights. For example, when Dormer’s character first meets the journalist (Taylor Kinney, aka Mason Lockwood of Vampire Diaries fame) she tells him how the sisters lost both their parents in a car accident caused by a drunk driver who was never caught. But… if the driver was never caught, how did anyone know they were drunk? They could just be a really shit driver. You would think with all the untold millions lavished on film production these days, somebody somewhere along the line would notice such a gaping plot hole. Evidently not. Sigh.

As you would expect, the film is laced with the kind of creepy, unsettling horror you would expect from something so Japan-centric, though it has minimal input from anyone actually Japanese apart from a few actors, which you would think was the minimum requirement. For the most part, it wasn’t even filmed in Japan. The Japanese government don’t allow filming in Aokigahara forest so apart from a few scenes shot in Tokyo, the bulk of the movie was filmed in a warehouse Serbia. I shit you not. The forest is suitably creepy, though, and there are some sleek touches.

On its release, The Forest was met with an avalanche of criticism and almost universal bad reviews. It has an overall rating of 9% on Rotten Tomatoes and let’s face it, it doesn’t get much more rotten than that. Even the regrettable Rocky V managed 28%. Does that mean the film most Rocky fans refuse to acknowledge is three times better than The Forest? Not at all. It could be better but plot holes aside, for the most part I actually enjoyed it. It’s a crazy world.

The original version of this review appears in the latest Morpheus Tales supplement, available FREE

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The Sker House Blog Tour

It’s finally over. Wow, that was energy sapping. Now I know how Thirty Seconds to Mars felt when they played 309 shows to break the record for the longest ever tour. Well, kinda. I probably got less groupies than they did. but I did meet a lot of cool, like-minded people, and gained some new readers along the way.

Here is a full itinerary of my stops, with links. Please take a few minutes to check out some of the sites. You might find something you like.

Fiona McVie runs an excellent cross-genre site dedicated specifically called Author Interviews. I gave her the lowdown on why I do what I do:

The ultra-cool Scary Reviews is dedicated to horror, post-apocalyptic fiction, dark fiction, thrillers and science fiction books and movies. I stopped by to talk about the REAL Maid of Sker:

Being horror’s #1 community on the web, Horror World should need no introduction. Here I discuss the truth behind Sker House, and why the book needed to be written:

The charming Em Lehrer does a wonderful job over at Keystroke Blog, a review and interview combo site. She’s also one of those uber-sassy young YouTubers who has her own channel called #BookTalk.

Gorefiend caters more toward the splatterpunk and extreme horror side of things. I did something special for them. When I wrote Sker House I incorporated lots of paranormal/supernatural phenomena into it, including Shadow People. They are most definitely real. We just don’t know what the fuck they are.

This is the definitive Sker House article, written for Americymru, the best Welsh ex-pat site you’ll ever see:

You may or may not know, one of the things I do is review books and films for Morpheus Tales, one of the UK’s biggest genre fiction mags. When editor Adam Bradley goes in for an interview, he goes in HARD. This is everything you wanted to know about me but couldn’t be bothered to ask:

There is a lot of historical fact in Sker House. Every country has episodes in their past that they are not proud of. Wales had the Wreckers, which I discussed over at The Horror Bookshelf.

I did an interview with the elegant, ultra-professional and self-confessed snark Lilyn G at Sci-fi & Scary

I spoke to Horror Made about why I ‘turned indie’ and the publishing industry in general.

Got me a namecheck in a piece on haunted houses by Daniel Cheely:

And finally, I went rogue and talked about my unhealthy fascination with Japanese horror movies for those lovable, yet so Deviant Dolls

Welcome to Sker House, a place where past and present collide.

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Finally, guess what? When one adventure finishes, another begins, and I just started the No Man’s Land: Horror in the Trenches blog tour. No rest for the wicked, as they say. So keep half an eye open for my updates and please ‘share’ and ‘like’ occasionally, if so inclined. It means the world to an impoverished indie writer.

Peace and love.


Christian Saunders

I did an interview over at Scary Reviews recently. Books, writing, horror and giant bananas!

Christian Saunders writes dark fiction and has had his stories published in Screams of Terror, Shallow Graves, Dark Valentine, Fantastic Horror, Unbroken Waters, Siren’s Call, and several anthologi…

Source: Christian Saunders


No Man’s Land – Horror in the Trenches

My new novella, No Man’s Land: Horror in the Trenches, is out now via Deviant Dolls Publications. July 1st  2016 marked the 100-year anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme in France between the Allies and the German Empire, which is still one of the episodes in human history. In the first hours, eight British soldiers fell PER SECOND and by the time it was over some five months later, there were a million dead.

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The Somme Offensive, 1916. Harry Doyle is a young, overawed British infantryman struggling to come to terms with the insanity of war. His main objective is staying alive, and getting back home to his family in one piece. But his hopes begin to diminish as he realizes the full extent of misery and destruction around him. And the German war machine isn’t the only thing he has to worry about. Something else is preying on his friends and comrades in the trenches, picking them off one by one. Something no amount of military training can prepare him for.

This book contains descriptions of graphic violence and is not suitable for minors. Cover art by Greg Chapman.

Proceeds will be donated to Help for Heroes 

No Man’s Land: Horror in the Trenches is available now, priced £1.99/$2.99:

 Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com 

Check out more great books from the Deviant Dolls HERE


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