Tag Archives: free

Fantasia Divinity #6

I’m pleased to report that my short story The sharpest Tool is included in the latest edition of Fantasia Divinity magazine, available to read free online HERE.

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The Sharpest Tool is a bit of a departure for me, and deals with some controversial topics I (and most level-headed writers) prefer to stay well away from. It is set firmly in the real world, rather than utilising any supernatural elements and if I tell you the story was inspired by the infamous Fritzl case, it should provide some clues as to the subject matter. I’ve always been fascinated by real life crime, and why people do the things they do. As an outsider looking in, you can usually see why people commit most crime. Money or revenge are two main motivators. Things like the Fritzl case are much harder to understand, and therefore more interesting.

If I say I hope you enjoy The Sharpest Tool I’d be lying. the truth is I hope it creeps you the fuck out, and maybe makes you think a little.

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The Light in Shotgun Horror Clips

A bit late, I know. But if you are interested, my flash fiction story The Light, which addresses the question we all think about from time to time, is included in issue #3 of Shotgun Horror Clips, available to view online now.

Edited by David Wilson, Shotgun Horror Clips is a FREE companion title to Dead Lights which launches in February 2017. Check out the awesome cover art by Shawn Langley:

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Sker House and the Angry Reader

So I managed to upset a couple of people last month when I ran a free promo on my novel Sker House. How can giving something away piss people off? Because in the run-up to the free promo, Sker House experienced some weird inexplicable sales spike. It happens. Not nearly often as I would like, but it happens. And the book sold a few copies at full price, $4.99/£3.99.

Then, the free promo kicked in.

Quite rightly, a few people (okay, one person) contacted me through Facebook and voiced their displeasure because they’d paid for something that was then made free days later. It’s probably fair to assume that if this one person felt cheated, others probably did too. I would. So maybe I should explain a couple of things.

Why do writers run free promos? Why do we work tirelessly for six months or more, then pay for artists to design our covers and editors to make us sound good, only to give the result away for free?

Because we are dumb, that’s why.

Not really. The simple truth is, we do it for exposure. Amazon uses magic algorithms to determine your book’s ranking. The higher your ranking, the more love  Amazon will give your book, in the form of recommending it to potential readers and what-not. Of course, writers also want to attract new readers, in the hope that they’ll like our work and perhaps buy another of our books at some point. We hope this works by the same principal as a drug dealer giving away the first hit for free. It doesn’t work like that at all, but that’s what we hope.

And then there are the reviews. Indie writers like me can never get enough reviews. The good, the bad, and the indifferent. We love them all. Reviews sell books. Most of us would beg, steal, kill or maim for an honest review.

The Sker House free promo was probably the most successful promotion I’ve ever done. In four days it was downloaded a total of 1,012 times. It peaked at #14 in Amazon’s Top 100 free horror books, and #3 in it’s sub-category (occult). Judging by the habits certain other indie writers display, I’m pretty sure that practically qualifies it as an ‘Amazon bestseller.’ So in that respect, even though I gave away about four grand’s worth of free books, the promo was a resounding success. Yeah, I know the majority of people won’t read it. It’ll sit on their Kindle, phone, or computer unopened for all eternity with all the other free books they’ve collected. But if only 1% of the people who downloaded Sker House read it then left a review on Amazon, the exercise would be more than worth it.

Be special. Be the 1%!

Weirdly, immediately after the promotion ended, Sker House enjoyed another unprecedented spike and sold more copies in three days than it had at any time since it’s release. This is another benefit of running free promos. Your book stays ‘visible’ for a while before sinking without trace again. We’re not talking thousands of sales here, or even hundreds. The harsh truth is that for most indie writers, to sell double figures of one title in one day is considered an achievement. To do it two or three days running represents the height of success.

Anyway, back to Angry Reader, I explained the situation to her and I think I made amends. Now I feel bad for everyone else who might think I pulled a fast one on them and I want to make it right. So if you also bought Sker House at full price between August 1st and August 25th 2016, send me proof of purchase, and I’ll let you choose any of my other indie titles for free. How’s that? Are we good?

Good.


The Literary Hatchet #14

My short story, Never Go Back, can be found in the new edition of The Literary Hatchet (#14). It’s the third in a loosely connected collection of tales about a fictional village called Wood Forge, where some pretty weird shit happens. Ghosts and hauntings, trolls living under bridges, zombies, strange disappearances. You name it, Wood Forge has (or will have) it.

This story was rejected a bunch of times because of a particular scene which one editor called, ‘distasteful.’ He’s not wrong. But hey, I write horror, not pop-up books. I thought it was funny, in a twisted kind of way, so the scene stayed. Credit to The Literary Hatchet for having the balls to go with it and let me do my thing.

Coincidentally, The Literary Hatchet also published another Wood Forge story, What Happened Next,  (the sequel to What Happened to Huw Silverthorne) back in 2014. I’ve always been a fan, it’s a great quality mag with a huge reputation, and it’s an honour to be included. This bumper 318-page issue on Pear Tree Press also features fiction by Eugene Hosey, Cody Schroeder, Stanford Allen, Mary King, Molly Richard, Tim Waldron and a whole bunch of others, as well as some cool as fuck artwork. Don’t miss out.

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“They always say never go back. I never really understood why, until I went back to Wood Forge, the little village where I grew up.”

You can download the PDF version for free, shell out for a physical copy, or you can be a chump and do neither. Your call.

The Literary Hatchet #14 is available HERE


Foo Fighters – Saint Cecilia EP Review

“Even in the smallest way perhaps these songs can bring a little light into this sometimes dark world. To remind us that music is life, and hope and that healing go hand-in-hand with song.”

– Dave Grohl, November 2015

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It has long been said that Dave Grohl is the nicest man in rock, and so it proved last month when his band made this new EP available for free as a ‘thank you’ to their legions of loyal fans. Not only that, but in an open letter he dedicated it to the victims of the Paris terrorist attacks and hosted a donation link on their website.

Having just finished Mick Wall’s biography Learning to Fly, I’m in the midst of a bit of a Foo’s frenzy. I’ve been a huge fan since an ex-girlfriend played me Monkeywrench about fifteen years ago. That song is still perpetually on my playlist, but it wasn’t until I saw them play Cardiff CIA on 2002’s One By One tour that I really started taking notice. It was the first time I saw them live, and the gig was spectacular. You can’t fail to be impressed by their professionalism and musicianship. But what really made a difference to me and most of the audience that night was when the band came out for the encores wearing Welsh football shirts. The national team had beaten Azerbaijan 2-0 in Baku earlier that day, a month after beating Italy 2-1 at the Millennium Stadium, and under the leadership of Mark Hughes were on the cusp of qualifying for the 2004 Euros. As it happened we eventually lost in a play-off to Russia, but the fact that Dave Grohl and co didn’t just acknowledge there was a match that day, but took the effort to ingratiate themselves with the Welsh public to such an extent was nice to see.

To the music…

Saint Cecilia contains 5 tracks, most of which sound more like vintage Foo’s. That isn’t surprising because one of the songs, the Neverending Sigh, is apparently almost two decades old. That would date it somewhere between the Foo’s first two albums which are still, by many people’s estimations, among their best to date. Title track excluded, there is a distinct lack of soaring, arms-aloft choruses to be had here. Compared to the last two studio albums, which at times come across as sprawling and unfocused, the songs on Saint Cecilia are short, punchy and to the point. Sean rocks up with a fuzzy guitar, smacks you in the face with it, and is gone in just 02:11 while Saviour Breath is so breathlessly intense it could easily pass for a Motorhead cover. Iron Rooster offers some respite with it’s jazzy hooks and dreamy melody, and the aforementioned Neverending Sigh rounds things off with the hauntingly self-analytical refrain ‘No one lets everyone in’ perhaps betraying a younger, less confident Dave.

According to Wiki, Saint Cecilia is the patron saint of musicians. It’s also the name of the hotel in Austin where these songs were recorded. Not that you would know they were recorded in a hotel. This EP isn’t just one for the completists, but a worthy addition to any collection. If it was a release by a younger band you would mark them one to watch, but the Foo’s have been there, done it, bought the Welsh football shirts, and they are still doing it. Kudos.

Oh, and Russia? We’ll see you in France next summer.

Get Saint Cecilia here


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