Tag Archives: splatterpunk

Subject #270374 in DOA III

After six years and more than fifty authors, the Unholy Trinity is complete. This third instalment in the DOA series offers thirty stories from the originators of splatterpunk as well as the newest voices in extreme horror.

You’ll laugh…you’ll cry…you’ll vomit
Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

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Last year, I wrote one of the most twisted short stories I’ve ever attempted. It’s too twisted to even go into much detail here. Suffice to say it involves clinical drug trials, revenge and dismemberment, among other things. I called it Subject #270374.

Coincidentally, just as I finished it I saw a submission call from Blood Bound Books who were putting together another volume of their legendary DOA anthologies of extreme horror. Because they had published another of my stories in a previous volume, and because I honestly thought I had crossed too many lines for the story to interest any other publishers, I sent them Subject #270374 and sat back to wait for the rejection slip.

It didn’t come. Instead, a few weeks later, I received an email. They liked Subject #270374, but it wasn’t gory enough for them. They didn’t want me to tone it down, they wanted me to tone it UP. So that’s exactly what I did, even though I was sick in my mouth a couple of times.

After some discussion, and a few rounds of edits, Subject #270374 was finally accepted for DOA III where it sits with a veritable who’s who of extreme horror writers including Jack Ketchum, Bentley Little, Wrath James White, Shane McKenzie, Richard Christian Matheson, Edward Lee, Jeff Strand, Betty Rocksteady, and a whole host of others. I am very proud, and humbled, to be in such renowned and illustrious company.

So if you like your fiction bloody and bizarre, and have a strong stomach, come and check out DOA III.

We’ll be waiting.

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Splatterlands: Reawakening the Splatterpunk Revolution (Book Review)

Splatterlands: Reawakening the Splatterpunk revolution

Splatterlands: Reawakening the Splatterpunk revolution

By definition, splatterpunk first emerged in the mid 1980’s as a reaction to the more traditional, suggestive horror story, and was characterised by bloody, visceral, in-your-face horror depicting the true effects, physical and psychological, of extreme violence. This new anthology on Grey Matter Press aims to breathe life (or death) back into the ailing genre by lining up new up-n-comers with more established writers. Dubbed ‘a collection of personal, intelligent and subversive horror,’ Splatterlands certainly delivers. Editor Sharon Lawson explains, “In Splatterlands, we have assembled a collection of stories whose themes intend to show that horror can, indeed, be considered literature. True horror is not just about uncontrolled violence, excessive blood or sexual degradation of women, or men for that matter. And because we believe that, we’ve created Splatterlands, a collection that we call ‘Horror with a Point.’”

A growing band of horror fans believe that the purpose of this much-maligned genre is to push boundaries, if not smash them down with a sturdy axe. And this collection endeavours to do just that, exploring such controversial themes as religious fanaticism, physical and mental abuse, societal corruption and good old-fashioned serial killers, and kicking off in style with with a nasty little shocker called Heirloom, by Michael Laimo. Two of my favourites in this impressively gory set of 13 are Housesitting by Ray Garton, which warns of the danger of snooping, and Party Guests by Chad Stroup, which takes us into the mind of a very disturbed individual. The story that lives longest in the memory, however, is the Defiled by Christine Morgan, a twisted account of Viking rape and pillage that comes to a satisfyingly vengeful end. As you would expect in a collection of this size, there is a small amount of filler, ie. some stories are stronger than others. But the even the weaker stories serve a purpose here as they make the jewels in the crown shine even brighter.

Grey Matter is quickly becoming one of the leading independent publishing houses. Unlike some of their competitors, everything they do is of the highest quality. This is well worth a punt, and look out for the upcoming Dark Visions 1 and 2, which promise to be even better. Look out, fly-by-night publishing houses, there is a new kid on the block. They have your number, a sharp knife, and they are creeping up your stairs right now.

Available from: http://greymatterpress.com/books/

This review also appears in the following places:

http://www.deadpixelpublications.com/
http://morpheustales.wix.com/morpheustales#!supplement/c14cx


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